Twofold

Surprises also come in twofold – wonder and shock.

More than a week earlier, little lady Kay went to the stage to earn a few minutes applause being included in the list. She had known from the past semester that she did good but never expected that she would be recognized on stage because nobody told her. Yea, yea, it is a short timed moment of praise. Nobody would have even remembered that she once ‘graced’ that platform. But you know how it is with parents. It is more our moment than hers.

A week after, the symptoms began. The quiescence and the fever started to crush the vibrant little lady Kay. The whole week after the recognition, the fever was on and off. The paracetamol was incapable of defeating the fever. On the fifth day, she was already crying because of intense headache and worse feeling of quiescence. She was immediately brought to the hospital. It is heartbreaking and scary for us, the parents.

Coming home is little lady Kay’s wish after staying in the hospital for almost three days. She was crying on the second day and had become vulnerable probably because of boredom and inactivity. I can relate so much because I was with her most of the time. And inactivity kills. A respite in a hospital is not a good suggestion for a break from it all.

I hope she had learned her lessons well while in the hospital. Illness isn’t the only thing that spoils the appetite (Ivan Turgeney). I knew that hearing Dra. C*’s stories about the ordeal of the young women they have been assisting taught her about the value of womanhood. I knew she would never want to go back to the hospital, and that she has to take care of herself, too: drink plenty, plenty of water, avoid street foods, have enough rest, rest when feeling tired, stop when needed. I knew, too, she did not enjoy having a limited privacy. She was like imprisoned with the IV and immobile because of the painful antibiotic injected intravenously.

She was diagnosed with nonspecific systemic viral illness. Should I be thankful it was not dengue or typhoid fever? No, never. No one will ever want to stay in the hospital even if it’s as comfortable as a comfy suite, I bet, or even if the walls are decorated with entertaining animal pictures.

Would you wanna know what we all learned from the news today? It is from Ripley’s.

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Twofold

Surprises also come in twofold – wonder and shock.

More than a week earlier, little lady Kay went to the stage to earn a few minutes applause being included in the list. She had known from the past semester that she did good but never expected that she would be recognized on stage because nobody told her. Yea, yea, it is a short timed moment of praise. Nobody would have even remembered that she once ‘graced’ that platform. But you know how it is with parents. It is more our moment than hers.

A week after, the symptoms began. The quiescence and the fever started to crush the vibrant little lady Kay. The whole week after the recognition, the fever was on and off. The paracetamol was incapable of defeating the fever. On the fifth day, she was already crying because of intense headache and worse feeling of quiescence. She was immediately brought to the hospital. It is heartbreaking and scary for us, the parents.

Coming home is little lady Kay’s wish after staying in the hospital for almost three days. She was crying on the second day and had become vulnerable probably because of boredom and inactivity. I can relate so much because I was with her most of the time. And inactivity kills. A respite in a hospital is not a good suggestion for a break from it all.

I hope she had learned her lessons well while in the hospital. Illness isn’t the only thing that spoils the appetite (Ivan Turgeney). I knew that hearing Dra. C*’s stories about the ordeal of the young women they have been assisting taught her about the value of womanhood. I knew she would never want to go back to the hospital, and that she has to take care of herself, too: drink plenty, plenty of water, avoid street foods, have enough rest, rest when feeling tired, stop when needed. I knew, too, she did not enjoy having a limited privacy. She was like imprisoned with the IV and immobile because of the painful antibiotic injected intravenously.

She was diagnosed with nonspecific systemic viral illness. Should I be thankful it was not dengue or typhoid fever? No, never. No one will ever want to stay in the hospital even if it’s as comfortable as a comfy suite, I bet, or even if the walls are decorated with entertaining animal pictures.

Would you wanna know what we all learned from the news today? It is from Ripley’s.

Bow!

I find it odd that a friend of my daughter does the repetitive bowing each time we meet. Each time he safely brings her home and I meet them at the door, he does this seemingly incessant bows accompanied by a greeting. When he leaves, he does the same. Sometimes he does the short, repetitive, and crisp bows. There was a time, I remember, that he bowed at a deeper angle. It was like a mannerism actually. I had already asked my daughter if his parents are Japanese. Not one is a pure Japanese. But his father and a relative works in Japan I was told. His grandmother has a very little percentage of Japanese blood. Those do not explain why he acts in that manner. But could it be that the guru is the grandma?

I don’t have anything against the young man, and this is not gossiping (my dear daughter, this is not, because I am not from showbiz he he). This is not a telltale also. The thing is, I haven’t met anybody who greets that way, and leaves that way, too. There is a bonus with the gesture actually – an almost shy but sincere smile.

Because of that, I surfed for the facts about the act. I snatched some from Wikipedia, and I find them very informative:

  • – a bow is a social gesture used to show politeness or courtesy
  • – prominent in China, Korea and Japan
  • – originated as a gesture of subordination
  • – bowing is not only reserved for greeting, but it is also a gesture of respect
  • – different bows are used for apologies and gratitude
  • – some bows are used to express humility, sincerity, remorse, and deference
  • – some bows are used in traditional arts and religious ceremonies
  • – bows are generally divided into 3 types: informal, formal and very formal

The young man’s handsome face surely reads that I find the gesture weird and at the same time fascinating. I am sure he does it out of respect and to show courtesy. A plus point?? 😀

Just to share something for the day. Bow!

Bow!

I find it odd that a friend of my daughter does the repetitive bowing each time we meet. Each time he safely brings her home and I meet them at the door, he does this seemingly incessant bows accompanied by a greeting. When he leaves, he does the same. Sometimes he does the short, repetitive, and crisp bows. There was a time, I remember, that he bowed at a deeper angle. It was like a mannerism actually. I had already asked my daughter if his parents are Japanese. Not one is a pure Japanese. But his father and a relative works in Japan I was told. His grandmother has a very little percentage of Japanese blood. Those do not explain why he acts in that manner. But could it be that the guru is the grandma?

I don’t have anything against the young man, and this is not gossiping (my dear daughter, this is not, because I am not from showbiz he he). This is not a telltale also. The thing is, I haven’t met anybody who greets that way, and leaves that way, too. There is a bonus with the gesture actually – an almost shy but sincere smile.

Because of that, I surfed for the facts about the act. I snatched some from Wikipedia, and I find them very informative:

  • – a bow is a social gesture used to show politeness or courtesy
  • – prominent in China, Korea and Japan
  • – originated as a gesture of subordination
  • – bowing is not only reserved for greeting, but it is also a gesture of respect
  • – different bows are used for apologies and gratitude
  • – some bows are used to express humility, sincerity, remorse, and deference
  • – some bows are used in traditional arts and religious ceremonies
  • – bows are generally divided into 3 types: informal, formal and very formal

The young man’s handsome face surely reads that I find the gesture weird and at the same time fascinating. I am sure he does it out of respect and to show courtesy. A plus point?? 😀

Just to share something for the day. Bow!

Secrets Revealed According to Her

Secrets revealed according to her. Because of a post by her and by him, I decided to update my long forgotten blog in Filipino. I decided to change the domain name. I first exported the contents of the old Sa Aming Wika to the new one. It was not really difficult. The process involved only a few clicks.

The reason why I did this is to gain access to the blogroll which does not function in the old Sa Aming Wika. I don’t know why this is so.

😦

My recent post in the new Sa Aming Wika talks about secrets. It dwelt on the question – Are you going to tell a secret to somebody or keep it to yourself? If you like to read the post you can visit the site here -> Sa Aming Wika. But if you like to answer the question here, please feel free to do so.

Secrets Revealed According to Her

Secrets revealed according to her. Because of a post by her and by him, I decided to update my long forgotten blog in Filipino. I decided to change the domain name. I first exported the contents of the old Sa Aming Wika to the new one. It was not really difficult. The process involved only a few clicks.

The reason why I did this is to gain access to the blogroll which does not function in the old Sa Aming Wika. I don’t know why this is so.

😦

My recent post in the new Sa Aming Wika talks about secrets. It dwelt on the question – Are you going to tell a secret to somebody or keep it to yourself? If you like to read the post you can visit the site here -> Sa Aming Wika. But if you like to answer the question here, please feel free to do so.

Over-indulgence is a sin

Another little drink wouldn’t do us any harm.

– Edith Sitwell (1887 – 1964)

Warning:  Men can be faced with rape charges doing it with drunk women.  See the news.

So munch on, crunch on, take your nuncheon,
Breakfast, supper, dinner, luncheon.

– Robert Browning (1812 – 1889)

Warning:  Obese women can put their health and their children’s at risk during pregnancy.  See the news.

Children, in general, are overclothed and overfed. To these causes, I impute most of their diseases.

– William Cadogan (1711 – 1797)

Warning: Children’s clothing doesn’t have to be offensive to be stylish.  See more of the news.

Nothing is more fatal to Health, than an over Care of it.

– Benjamin Franklin (1706 – 1790)

Warning:  Over-indulgence to health information on the internet can fuel hypochondria. See more of the news.

Minds like bodies, will often fall into a pimpled, ill-conditioned state from mere excess of comfort.

– Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870)

Warning: Idleness can lead to drug abuse and delinquency among youth.  See the news.

Pleasure’s a sin, and sometimes sin’s a pleasure.

– Lord Byron (1788 – 1824)

Warning: Disregard for safe sex practices results to the rise of sexually transmitted diseases. More of the news.